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Dayshift: Start Where You Are (Smashwords Edition)

Dawn's latest book is filled with gems that remind us that personal growth is a lifelong endeavor. By accepting the book's daily invitations to increase our awareness, ...

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Dayshift: Start Where You Are (Amazon Edition)

Dayshift: Start Where You Are (Amazon Edition)

Dawn's latest book is filled with gems that remind us that personal growth is a lifelong endeavor. By accepting the book's daily invitations to increase our awareness, ...

Read More

DayShift: Start Where You Are is filled with gems that remind us that personal growth is a lifelong endeavor. By accepting the book's daily invitations to increase our awareness, we can build powerful habits that create lasting results.

If you have an enemy, and you think all of the time about how they harmed
you, and your grievance, you won’t be able to eat, you won’t be able to
sleep, you won’t be able to enjoy anything. Why give them that
satisfaction?
– Dalai Lama

If we are consumed by the negative actions of others, it consumes our lives.
– Sharon Salzberg

What is the good of dragging up sufferings which are over, of being
unhappy now because you were then.
– Seneca

In a recent interview with Oprah, Rosie O’Donnell commented on her
tendency to focus on aspects of her past that were painful, including the
death of her mother when she was ten years old. However she concluded the
interview by saying that she’d had an amazing life and to constantly think
of the times when it wasn’t would rob her of her joy now.

We have a tendency to drag past pain and pleasure into our present. I’ve
heard men and women talk longingly and lovingly about past relationships,
noting that nothing in the present or future could possibly match them. So
they remain stuck in the past.

I’ve also heard them talk about the horrors of painful relationships,
vowing to never go there again. So a wall goes up and they remain stuck in
the past.

I remember a man in one of my relationship workshops commenting that he
realized that he had been happy in his first marriage only during his
second one. He had not been able to enjoy his past relationship because he
had hungered for a future one he thought would have been better. He was
now hungering for the past. He was living everywhere but in the present.

Perhaps this is the human condition. Our challenge is to honour the past,
learning its lessons; make plans for the future, accepting that it is
unpredictable. And live in the present, love in the present, find joy in
the present.